Sunday, January 10, 2010

Amino acid found in a comet

Today in Adelaide, South Australia it is a maximum of 43 degrees centigrade and we are towards the end of a heatwave. Should be back down to a maximum of 26 degrees C on Tuesday. I have been watching the TV news about the big freeze in Europe, and in the US.

So, I am in the cool of the local library reading astronomy magazines catching up in this area of my interests.

"Astronomy" magazine dated December 2009 on page 23 has an interesting item.

"Samples of Comet Wild returned to Earth by NASA's Stardust spacecraft show the unmistakable presence of the amino acid glycine."

"Because terrestrial life uses glycine, earlier researchers didn't know if the glycine might be earthly contamination. But Elsila's team found the glycine carbon-isotope abundances matched those in space."

"Our discovery supports the theory that some of life's ingredients formed in space and were delivered to Earth long ago by meteorites and comet impacts..."

1 comment:

  1. Hi Pauline,
    Thank you for your interesting blog posts.

    I read your comments about the Khoury case. I was well aware of the possible OOBE elements, but this is just a small part of the episode and does not render the event, in my view, as generated by Peter Khoury's mind. As you point out there is the element of the hair sample.

    My primary focus in this case study was to see if some science could be utilised in studying such events. I think it has been worthwhile. Now if a lot more cases could be approached in similar ways there could be the potential of some further useful information that might give us some more insights into these sorts of experiences. Since the 1970s I have closely examined all sorts of aspects to see if abductions are just pat of the human condition. A lot are but some may be giving us insights into something else.
    Regards,
    Bill Chalker

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