Monday, September 26, 2011

Surveillance technology and mini-ufos

Dear readers

Jenny Randles from the UK has a very interesting article in Fortean Times issue 277 (August 2011 p.31.)

The article is about Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs.) "Going back to the days when these craft were first tested - one might think in a more liberal environment than today's War on Terror - we find decade's worth of UFO sightings that would make more sense if interpreted in the context of UAV technology."

Jenny reports on a sighting on 4 May 2011 by 17 year old Laurance Baker of Widnes, Cheshire. "What made this story different was that the small oval 'craft' flew very low above the art design student's head and was - he insists - a structural device that he suspected to be 'stealth aircraft technology." He based his argument on the craft's unusual design. Modest in size but covered in black cell-like structures similar to scales and with an antenna at the rear that projected over the curved surface pointing forward in the direction the object was travelling."

Jenny then takes a look at other cases which might fit the UAV scenario.

27 August 1979. Two men flying in a Cessna aircraft in Surrey, went into a steep dive to avoid "a small dough-nut shaped object as it crossed their path. This object then travelled around the Cessna as if inspecting them...the description...includes reference to a honeycomb of small cells making up the outer structure, which rotated...Another pilot...had a more distinct view of the min-ufo the next day...it was heading for nearby Farnborough, the home of experimental aircraft design..."

April 1984. A medical research scientist saw "...a hovering object made from a series of 'grid' structures...near the Lakenheath military base in East Anglia. I later discovered...that she had  probably seen a UAV that had temporarily gone out of control..."

"I have many other cases in my files and their locations cluster around military or BAE locations such as Warton in Lancashire."

Jenny notes "In 2007, a new hovering spy camera was unveiled that was even likened to a flying saucer at the launch...This device was based on a mini-helicopter with multiple rotors...including an antenna and a surface area made up of small, black, scale-like tiles."

"Moreover, some trade sources suggest that similar devices, have been sold to UK special forces recently for highly covert surveillance activities, that, needless to say, is not going to be discussed openly."

For information on BAE Australia click here. For an article on the use of UAVs by the Australian Army and RAAF click here.

Have readers come across any cases which might have been due to UAVs?

1 comment:

  1. Hiya Pauline, back in the late 80s and 90s there were a number of reports of 'black triangles' in the NW of England. As I recall, they were sometimes described as being quite small. The sightings focused around the M6 corridor just a few miles east of British Aerospace at Warton. It seems fair to consider that many of them were UAVs and Taranis was developed there.

    I haven't read the article, but going off the quotes, I wonder if Randles has overemphasised the connection? She's a very good researcher so I'm not sure. The hovering spy camera (2007) was described as 'flying saucer' due to it hovering. It actually looks very clunky and very much 'one of ours.' Nobody in their right mind would think otherwise.

    Also, whereas some sightings reports are very clear about unusual flight-characteristics and silence, drones/UAVs are conventional in shape with motors. There are few videos of UAVs with clear audio but they are described as being noisy and designed for surveillance/ attack from high altitude.

    In a sense, it's good for business when UAVs are associated with the performance of 'true ufo' reports. Part of the message is always to play up our technology. We can 'read the print of a newspaper' from space and wire missiles with 'postage stamp precision' and yet the evidence suggests otherwise.

    Black technology will certainly account for many sightings over the years, but how many times do people try to explain even more of them with this explanation?

    http://blog.trossenrobotics.com/2007/05/25/uk-police-add-hovering-spy-drone-to-surveillance-arsenal/

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